July25Unitedkingdom  2021 

*WearMask,KeepSanitizeYourHands*

Abstract Volume: 1 Issue: 2 ISSN:

The Act of Brushing Teeth

Dr. Shrutika Jayaswal

 

*Corresponding Author: Dr. Shrutika Jayaswal, Dentist, India.


 Received Date:  September 19, 2020

 Publication Date:  October 01, 2020

The Act of Brushing Teeth

Brushing your teeth is an important part of your dental care routine. For a healthy mouth and smile. Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft-bristled brush. The size and shape of your brush should fit your mouth allowing you to reach all areas easily.

Replace your toothbrush every three or four months, or sooner if the bristles are frayed. A worn toothbrush won’t do a good job of cleaning your teeth.

Make sure to use fluoride toothpaste.

The proper brushing technique is to:

* Place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums.

* Gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes.

* Brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth.

* To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.

 

Of course, brushing your teeth is only a part of a complete dental care routine. You should also make sure to:

Clean between teeth daily once a day. Tooth decay-causing bacteria still linger between teeth where toothbrush bristles can’t reach. This helps remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.

Eat a balanced diet that limits sugary beverages and snacks.

See your dentist regularly for the prevention and treatment of oral disease.

Above was the information we all want to know or maybe knowing to the point.

Let's seek some more knowledge to again perfect healthy teeth ...

However, oral health is about more than cavities and gum disease. Research has shown that there is an association between the health of a person’s mouth and their overall health. Experts consider oral health problems to be a global health burden.

Without treatment, tooth decay or gum problems can lead to pain, problems with self-confidence, and tooth loss. These issues may lead to malnutrition, speech problems, and other challenges in a person’s work, school, or personal life.

People can prevent these problems with proper dental care, both at home and in the dentist’s office. The following are some best practices that can keep teeth and gums healthy.

 

1. Brush regularly but not aggressively

Most people are aware that brushing their teeth twice a day is one of the most important practices for removing plaque and bacteria and keeping teeth clean. However, brushing may only be effective if people use the correct technique.

People should brush using small circular motions, taking care to brush the front, back, and
top of every tooth. This process takes between 2 and 3 minutes. People should avoid sawing
back-and-forth motions.

Brushing too hard or using a hard-bristled toothbrush can damage tooth enamel and the gums. The effects of this may include tooth sensitivity, permanent damage to the protective enamel on the teeth, and gum erosion.

It is recommended to use a toothbrush that has soft bristles. It is suggested to change their toothbrush every 3 months or when the ends start to look frayed.

 

2. Use fluoride

Fluoride comes from an element in the earth’s soil called fluorine. Many experts believe that fluoride helps prevent cavities, and it is a common ingredient in toothpaste and mouthwash.

However, some dental products do not contain fluoride, and some people do not use it at all.

Evidence suggests that a lack of fluoride can lead to tooth decay, even if a person takes care of their teeth otherwise. A recent review found that brushing and flossing do not prevent a person from getting cavities if they do not use fluoride.

 

3. Floss once a day

Flossing can remove plaque and bacteria from between the teeth, where a toothbrush is unable to reach. It can also help prevent bad breath by removing debris and food that has become trapped between the teeth.

 

4. See a dentist regularly

Experts recommend that people see a dentist every 6 months for a checkup. During a routine dental examination, a hygienist will clean the teeth and remove plaque and hardened tartar.

The dentist will check for visual signs of cavities, gum disease, mouth cancer, and other oral health issues. They may sometimes also use dental X-rays to check for cavities.

The results of a recent study confirmed that children and adolescents should see a dentist every 6 months to help prevent cavities. However, adults who practice good dental hygiene every day and have a low risk of oral health problems may be able to go less frequently.

 

5. Do not smoke

Smoking harms the body’s immune system, which makes it difficult for the body to heal tissues, including those in the mouth. The Dental association name smoking as a risk factor for gum disease, they warn that people who smoke may experience slow healing after a dental procedure.

Smoking also affects the appearance of the mouth, leading to yellowing of the teeth and tongue, and it can give breath a bad odor.

 

6. Consider a mouthwash

Some studies indicate that certain mouthwashes can benefit oral health. For example, one review found that mouthwash containing chlorhexidine, an antibacterial ingredient, helps control plaque and gingivitis. Mouthwashes with certain essential oils are also effective, according to a meta-analysis.

People may wish to ask their dentist which is the best mouthwash for their individual needs. Mouthwash cannot substitute brushing and flossing, but it can complement these practices.

 

7. Limit sugary foods and starches

Consuming sugar can lead to cavities. Studies continue to highlight the significant role that sugar plays in adverse dental health outcomes. Common culprits include candy and desserts, but many processed foods also contain added sugar.

Experts have also stated that starchy foods, such as crackers, bread, chips, and pasta, can cause tooth decay. They explain that these foods linger in the mouth and break down into simple sugars, on which acid-producing bacteria feed. This acid can cause tooth decay.

Instead of starchy foods, it is recommended to eat plenty of fiber-rich fruits and vegetables as well as dairy products without added sugar.

 

8. Drink water instead of sugary drinks

Sugar-sweetened beverages are the number one source of added sugars in the typical diet of those Sipping on soda, juice, or other sugary drinks can lead to a higher risk of cavities.

It is recommended to drink drinking water for all the meals.

 

Tips for kids

A child’s primary teeth, which people sometimes call baby teeth, are just as important as their permanent teeth. Baby teeth help a child chew and speak. They are placeholders for future permanent teeth.

If a child loses a baby tooth to decay, this can disrupt the space in the mouth and make it difficult for the adult tooth to develop correctly.

With this in mind, it is best to introduce good dental care for children during infancy. The following practices will help keep a child’s teeth and gums healthy:

Wipe baby’s gums with a warm, wet washcloth every day, even before they have any teeth. Doing this removes sugars from the gums and can help a baby become familiar with the feeling of cleaning their teeth.

Babies and toddlers should not go to bed with bottles or sippy cups. Milk and juice contain sugars that can cause tooth decay if they remain on the teeth for extended periods.

As a baby approaches 1 year of age, start getting them used to a sippy cup. Aim to stop using bottles by their first birthday.

Once a baby has teeth, brush them twice a day with a soft baby toothbrush. Use a tiny amount of fluoride toothpaste, no bigger than a grain of rice. Children who are 3 to 6 years of age may use a pea-sized amount of toothpaste.

Parents or caregivers should brush the child’s teeth for them.

Keep the toothpaste out of children’s reach when it is not in use.

Parents and caregivers should not share eating utensils with a child or clean pacifiers by putting them in their mouths. Both of these actions can pass the adult’s cavity-causing bacteria to the child.

 

Conclusion

Practicing good dental care from infancy to adulthood can help a person keep their teeth and gums healthy. Brushing and flossing daily, not smoking, eating a healthful diet, and having regular dental checkups can help people avoid cavities, gum disease, and other dental issues. It may also benefit their overall health

"Eating with your teeth is a necessity, but brushing them is an art"

 

Volume 1 Issue 2 October 2020

©All rights reserved by Dr. Shrutika Jayaswal.